25 MAIN STREET SUITE 444 • NORTHAMPTON, MA 01060

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 SATURDAY, APRIL 29  8:00 PM

PING PONG+SARDINIAN SONG

 

PEOPLE DOING THINGS

25 MAIN STREET SUITE 444 • NORTHAMPTON, MA 01060

STUDIO4 is proud to present COLLIDER, a new series juxtaposing performers from far afield. The COLLIDER series reaches across the arts and into the margins of human endeavor, showcasing masters of craft in singular pursuits—“people doing things”—in folk traditions, the natural and inventive sciences, outsider art, game-playing, and more.

                                     

COLLIDER 01 on Saturday, April 29 at 8pm will feature a professional ping pong exhibition by top-seeded New England players, to be followed by the captivating sounds of TENORES de ATERÚE.

 

ERNEST VIRGO, the two-time former National Table Tennis Champion of Jamaica and a coach of the USA Table Tennis Team, will square off against Massachusetts native STEVE KASHA, the recent tournament champion at Zing! Table Tennis in Easthampton. Ping pong first appeared as an after-dinner parlor game among the upper classes in Victorian England, who used books as paddles and to serve as a net. Some historians speculate that the game, also known as “gossima” and “whiff-whaff,” was originated by British military officers in India in the 1860s. The first unofficial world championship was held in 1902 and soon after became a global phenomenon. Table tennis was at the center of a diplomatic watershed in 1971, when China invited the U.S. National Team for a series of friendly matches against the home team—the first U.S. delegation to visit since 1949. President Nixon, who visited China a year later, described it as "the week that changed the world." In 1988, table tennis featured for the first time as an Olympic event. Today it is the most popular indoor game in the world.

TENORES de ATERÚE (Avery Book, Gideon Crevoshay, Carl Linich, and Doug Paisley) formed in 2007 to study and perform traditional songs from the Mediterranean island of Sardinia. The entrancing guttural sounds, overtones, and rhythmic precision of the traditional singing form called cantu a tenore led UNESCO to declare it a “Masterpiece of the Oral and Intangible Heritage of Humanity” (2005). The Tenores are the only ensemble outside of Sardinia that is dedicated to singing cantu a tenore. Over the years, the Tenores have been in-demand performers on stages throughout the US, Canada, and Sardinia. They have appeared on VPR, New York City’s WFMU, BBC Radio, and on Sardinia’s Radio Barbagia and TCS Television. Aterúe, The Singers From Elsewhere, a film about the group’s encounters with the living world of cantu a tenore, is soon to be released. See the trailer below!